Video Archive

Newsfilm from May 26th 1966 showing early construction work on the Kensington Expressway (NYS route 33). The construction obliterated a section of Humboldt Parkway which had been an original part of the Olmstead plan for Buffalo, but connected the city center with the eastern suburbs including the airport with a high speed corridor.

This film clip was rescued from destruction by the BBA, digitiized, stored as part of the BBA film archive, and is just one of over 1500 news clips from WBEN-TV (WIVB) from 1966.

In the spring of 1966, Cassius Clay the boxer who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, came to nearby Toronto to train for an upcoming fight with George Chuvalo. Clay entered the session in usual grandeur. Joey Reynolds can be seen for a moment in the front row of the audience. There is no sound track on this news film.

This film clip was rescued from destruction by the BBA, digitiized, stored as part of the BBA film archive, and is just one of over 1500 news clips from WBEN-TV (WIVB) from 1966.

January 17, 2009: BBA begins organizational steps to organize and catalog the newsfilm. Create Internship program with University of Buffalo’s Library Sciences to begin catalog process.
June 2, 2009: Hold seminar with department chairs of all local colleges to detail the Archive Project and invite participation.
June 17, 2009: Attend National Conference held in Buffalo where the BBA Archive Project is presented to the group by Dr. Michael Frisch from UB’s Rand Force Development
June 17, 2009: Attend National Conference held in Buffalo where the BBA Archive Project is presented to the group by Dr. Michael Frisch from UB’s Rand Force Development
August 9, 2009: Buffalo Broadcasters Association begin annual 5k run as a fundraiser for the Archive Project. Through 2013, the 5k run has raised nearly $45,000 for this project
June, 2010: BBA holds meeting with Scene Savers and Rand Force to discuss collaboration of digitizing, then indexing the newsfilm so it can be searched and linked to like material with the click of a mouse for easy access to historians, educators, students and the general public. It was agreed to complete a prototype project to determine costs and a timeline to complete digitization of the entire collection.

This was the start of our mission to digitize the film archive in June 2007. The BBA brings AMIA archivist Lisa Carter and two graduate students from NYU to Buffalo. They view the film collection and meet with management of all the local television stations. Lisa outlines steps to begin the task of digitizing the film.The BBA creates first “big picture” vision of the  challenge ahead,  acknowledging the rich moving image history of Buffalo.